Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend World Conference on Climate Change Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Gene Fry

Energy Efficiency & Global warming Consultant
USA

Keynote: 3.7 to 6.5 °C global surface warming from today’s CO2 and CH4 levels

Time : 09:00-09:25

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gene Fry photo
Biography:

Gene Fry completed his PhD in resource economics from Cornell University in 1989. He was director of policy and planning for the Maine Energy Office, then economist in the electric power division of the Massachusetts utility commission for 13 years. After stints as contributing editor for climate change issues at the Global Environmental Change Report and Business and the Environment, he managed energy efficiency program evaluations for Northeast Utilities for 3 years, until he retired in 2011. He has published 2 articles in refereed journals.

Abstract:

Earth’s surface will warm, due just to today’s 400 ppm CO2 and 1840 ppb CH4, by 2-8 x as much as it has since 1880. Already, land surfaces have warmed 1.0°C (5-year mean) over the last 50 years and 1.5°C over the last 130. Sea surfaces have warmed 1.0°C over the past 100. Meanwhile, ocean depths add more heat every 2 years than all the energy humans have ever used.rnVostok ice core data analysis connects today’s CO2 levels with 7.4°C surface warming there, compared to the 1951-1980 mean. Using a 50% polar to global ∆°C conversion, using NASA observations since 1880, the ∆ 3.7°C result is highly consistent with CO2 and ∆°C data from 4 and 14 million years ago. Adding Vostok CH4 data to the analysis connects today’s CH4 and CO2 levels with 6.5°C global surface warming above baseline. ∆ 3.7°C globally (more inland and poleward) is enough to make Kansas, “breadbasket of the world,”as hot as Las Vegas.rnThe analysis suggests major lag effects to come, mostly from albedo changes. Some major albedo changes come this century, from disappearing Arctic sea ice and anthropogenic sulfates, plus receding snow cover. Albedo effects from ice loss in Greenland and Antarctica happen more slowly. When Earth last had 400 ppm CO2, sea levels were estimated at 20-35 meters above today’s, indicating up to 50% ice loss eventually. The loss rate is only 1/4 that during the recent ice ages, but still 6-7 meters / °C.rn

Keynote Forum

Agustin J. Colussi

California Institute of Technology
USA

Keynote: ‘Sizing’ heterogeneous chemistry in the conversion of gaseous dimethyl sulfide to atmospheric particles

Time : 09:25-09:50

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Agustin J. Colussi photo
Biography:

Agustín J. Colussi, a Senior Research Scientist at CALTECH since 1998, has published more than 200 papers in environmental physical chemistry.

Abstract:

The oxidation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions is a global source of cloud condensation nuclei. The amounts of the nucleating H2SO4(g) species produced in such process, however, remain uncertain. Hydrophobic DMS is mostly oxidized in the gas-phase into H2SO4(g) + DMSO(g) (dimethyl sulfoxide), whereas water-soluble DMSO is oxidized into H2SO4(g) in the gas-phase but into SO42- + MeSO3- (methane sulfonate) on water surfaces. Thus, R = MeSO3-/non-sea-salt-SO42- ratios would therefore gauge both the strength of DMS sources and the extent of DMSO heterogeneous oxidation if Rhet = MeSO3-/SO42- for DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) were known. Here we report that Rhet = 2.7, a value obtained from online electrospray mass spectra of DMSO(aq) + ·OH(g) reaction products, which quantifies the MeSO3- produced in DMSO heterogeneous oxidation on aqueous aerosols for the first time. On this basis, the inverse R-dependence on particle radius in size-segregated aerosol collected over Syowa station and Southern oceans is shown to be consistent with the competition between DMSO gas-phase oxidation and its mass accommodation followed by oxidation on aqueous droplets. Geographical R variations are thus associated with variable contributions of the heterogeneous pathway to DMSO atmospheric oxidation, which increase with the specific surface area of local aerosols.

Keynote Forum

Jaime Senabre

SINIF
Spain

Keynote: Wildfire and climate change

Time : 09:50-10:15

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jaime Senabre photo
Biography:

Jaime Senabre (1966). Psychologist (UNED). He has extensive postgraduate training, achieving a total of five Masters, including: Master in Occupational Health, Safety and Workplace Risk by Camilo José Cela University of Madrid; Master of Psychopathology and Health, UNED; Master of Civil Protection and Emergency Management, University of Valencia. He is also a Diploma in Psychological Intervention in Emergencies and Disasters, Environmental Consultant, Expert in Human Resources and Criminology. rnDirector and Chairman of the Scientific-Professional Committee of the National Symposium on Forest Fires -SINIF (2008-2015)- and creator of “SINIF Awards”, for Innovation and Technological Research, Prevention and Management Development on Forest Fires Member of: Spanish Society for the Study of Anxiety and Stress, Spanish Association for Clinical Psychology and Psychopathology.

Abstract:

One of the reasons that an individual, a community and a society doesn´t act preventively against the probability of a risk is due to the perception people have about the likelihood of that risk and the proximity of their consequences. It can also happen that, while having a full awareness and perception of the probability of the risk, both individual and community and society doesn´t have the necessary resources to prevent or minimize it. A perception and resource availability must be added a factor, the will.rnThe same risk can have different interpretations and meanings and affect health, the environment, property, future generations, etc. From this psychosocial approach to risk, when to assess, interpret and judge a risk we have to take into account a number of quantitative (eg. index of probability and amount of losses) and qualitative factors (eg. involuntary nature of exposure, lack of personal control, uncertainty about the likelihood or consequences of exposure, lack of credibility and trust in the institutions that manage). Also, the perception and the meaning that people can be attributed to the risk will be influenced by different types of beliefs, values and social contexts.rnOn many occasions, low priority is given to some of the dangers related to the environment, which leads many companies to live on a stage of life "latent silent emergencies" which sometimes manifest themselves in varying degrees of threat, occurrence and intensity, reaching in some cases, to acquire the status of disaster, catastrophe or calamity.rnHuman behavior in disasters, in diachronic sense of the incident, passes through three stages: before, during and after. Thus, the perception of risk has to be placed in the temporary time "before".rnWe may be at an apparent dissociation between social risk perception and human behavior to the manifestation of disasters.rn

Keynote Forum

Bruce Barrett

University of Wisconsin
USA

Keynote: Mindfulness-based health-enhancement and carbon footprint reduction

Time : 11:20-11:45

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bruce Barrett photo
Biography:

Bruce Barrett MD PhD is a board certified and practising Family Physician, and tenured research Professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and has directed four randomized controlled trials funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, with more than 1,500 subjects. Two of his trials assess the impact of training in mindfulness-based stress reduction on the immune system and acute respiratory infection. He has led the Mindful Climate Action group since its inception in 2014: http://www.fammed.wisc.edu/mca/

Abstract:

Background:Greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are causing climate change. Behaviors including transportation, diet, and energy use influence societal processes that release greenhouse gas pollutants, but are also related to health and well-being. Replacing automobile driving with walking and cycling, for instance, may increase health and well-being while lowering environmental impact. Mindfulness-based practices can be effective in modifying health-related behaviors. Specific aims: (1) To pilot test a mindfulness-based behavioral program aimed at: (a) enhancement of health and well-being, and (b) reduction in carbon footprint; (2) To carryout a randomized controlled trialto assess impact on health, well-being, and carbon footprint. Approach: Our multi-disciplinary team has designed an 8-week mindfulness-based behavioral training program. The Mindful Climate Action (MCA) program aims to: (1) teach climate change core knowledge, (2) decrease household energy use, (3) reduce automobile and air transport, (4) increase active transport and physical activity, (5) modify dietary impact on carbon footprint, (6) reduce unnecessary purchasing and consumption, and (7) improve personal health and well-being. Significance: Despite known behavioral contributions towards climate change, little work has been done to understand and modify the individual-level choices and behaviors involved. Mindfulness-based trainings are rapidly proving successful for behavioral modification and health-enhancement. Behavioral training leading to increased active transport (more exercise), healthier plant-based diets, and reduced energy consumption and unnecessary purchasing could yield significant benefits in terms of both sustainability and personal health and well-being.

Keynote Forum

Ji Whan Ahn

Korea Institute of Geosceinces and Mineral Resources
Korea

Keynote: Coal combustion byproducts recycling and utilization for sustainable solutions to cliamte change

Time : 10:55-11:20

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ji Whan Ahn photo
Biography:

Ahn Ji Whan received a B.S, M.S and Ph.D degree in Mining and Minerals Engineering during the years 1986 ~ 1997 from Inha University and she has another master’s degree in Resources Environmental Economics from Yonsei University. Now Dr. Ahn is working as a Principal Researcher in Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Director for Resources, Environment and Materials R&D Center, KIGAM, President for Korea Institute of Limestone & Advanced Materials (KILAM), Chairperson, Japan/Korea International Symposium on Resources Recycling and Materials Science, Vice President of Korean Society for Geosystem Engineering and Vice President of Korea Institute of Resources and Recycling. Dr. Ahn is an Advisory Member for Ministry of Environment - consulting committee of waste treatment technology (ME-CCWTT) and she is Representative for ISO 102 (Iron Ore) from South Korea. In KIGAM, she has 20 years research experience and she started the multidisciplinary research areas and developed new novel technologies. Dr. Ji Whan Ahn has published more than 154 papers, 716 proceedings papers/Conference presentations and 71 patents. She received many awards, National Science Merit (Presidential Citation Award), The Excellent Research award from Ministry of Knowledge Economy and The First Women Ceramist award etc., for her research excellence

Abstract:

An increasing global demand for new products and emerging technologies that use rare earth elements (REEs) while global consumption of rare earth elements (REEs) has registered a steady and significant increase, their supply has drastically diminished. Rare earth elements (REEs) are found in most everyday applications because of their unique chemical and physical properties. The distribution and supply of the rare earths are highly demand, so convergence technologies are necessary for the recovery of critical rare earth elements from coal power plants waste or coal combustion by products and simultaneous CO2 utilization. Recycling and Utilization of coal byproducts are the sustaibale solutions to climate change. Carbonation is one of the cost effective and ecofriendly process for the recovery of rare earth metals by using limestone and limestone mixture from power plants waste or sludge. This accelerated carbonation is more suitable process for CO2 capture and utilized this CO2 for manufacturing different kinds of new calcium carbonates used industrial residues (e.g., power plants ash). This paper mainly concerns the case studies of sustainable critical rare earth elements in various fields and managing the supply chain risks of rare earth elements (REEs)

Keynote Forum

Frederick House

Emeritus, Drexel University
USA

Keynote: On the issue of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate change

Time : 11:20-11:45

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Frederick House photo
Biography:

Frederick House received his BS degree in meteorology from Penn State (1957) and served NATO forces in Europe as an Air Force Weather Officer. Upon discharge from service, he attended graduate school at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, receiving the MS (1962) and Ph.D. (1965) degrees in meteorology. Then he worked for the GCA Corporation in MA performing contract research for government and industry. In 1970, he came to Drexel University and taught physics and atmospheric science courses until retirement in August 2013. His research specialty is Satellite Meteorology with emphasis on earth radiation budget measurements and limb scanning the stratosphere in the infrared spectrum.

Abstract:

Greenhouse gases, in particular carbon dioxide, are responsible for warming the earth’s climate making the planet habitable for mankind. The physics of this warming is unquestioned. “The big problem, of course, is that evidence of warming is not evidence of what causes warming. One would be astonished if mankind, with its prodigious release of greenhouse gases….were not having an impact on climate. But how and how much are critical questions?” (1) This paper examines the question of how much relative to increases in carbon dioxide. In general, climate scientists look at global warming as a time series of changing temperature along with a time series of carbon dioxide increases. The issue herein is using one series to explain the other, both of which are singular functions in time. This process seems to be a fault in their analysis procedures. This paper applies the technique of Cross Correlation which is a standard method of estimating the degree to which two series are correlated. Global and hemispheric anomalies of temperature are taken from the HadCRUT4 (United Kingdom) data set and global carbon dioxide concentrations from the EPA (United States). The results indicate a relatively weak correlation of 0.691 globally, 0.689 and 0.662 for northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. A revealing correlation between temperature anomalies and sea level changes was a robust 0.89 as might be expected. Has the scientific community been overplaying the importance of carbon dioxide and not looking carefully at the evidence in front of them?

Keynote Forum

Nils-Axel Morner

Retired, Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics
Sweden

Keynote: Causes and effects of climate change

Time : 12:35-13:00

OMICS International Climate Change 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nils-Axel Morner photo
Biography:

Nils-Axel (”Niklas”) Mörner took his Ph.D. in Quaternary Geology at Stockholm University in 1969. He was head of a personal institute at Stockholm University and the Swedish National Council on Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics (P&G) from 1991 up to his retirement in 2005. He has written many hundreds of research papers and several books. He is a global traveller and has undertaking field studies in 59 different countries. Several students have taken their doctoral degree at the P&G institute, which became an international centre for global sea level change, paleoclimate, paleoseismics, neotectonics, paleomagnetism, Earth rotation, planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction, etc. He was president of the INQUA Neotectonics Commission (1981- 1989) and president of the INQUA Commission on Sea Level Changes and Coastal Dynamics (1999-2003). In 2008, he was awarded the Golden Condrite of Merit (from Algarve University) “for his irreverence and contribution to our understanding of sea level change”. Among his books one may note; Earth Rheology, Isostasy and Eustasy (Wiley, 1984), Climate Change on a Yearly to Millennial Basis (Reidel, 1984), Paleoseismicity of Sweden: a novel paradigm (P&G-print, 2003), The Greatest Lie Ever Told (P&G-print, 2007), The Tsunami Threat: Research & Technology (InTech, 2011), Geochronology: Methods and Case Studies (InTech, 2014), Planetary Influence on the Sun and the Earth, and a Modern Book-Burning (Nova, 2015).

Abstract:

Climate is constantly changing, and there is nothing new or unusual in the recorded changes over the last decades and centuries. The long-term Ice Age cycles are forced by the changes in the Earth–Sun relation. The yearly cycle is a function of the tilt of the spin-axis. The daily cycle is a function of Earth’s rotation. The decadal, centennial and millennial changes in climate have a more uncertain origin. The more we learn, the more obvious it becomes that they are forced (at least predominantly) by solar variability and its changes in emission of luminosity and solar wind. Having established this, we can be reasonably sure that we are facing a new Grand Solar Minimum to culminate at around 2030-2040. This implies that the period of global warming is more or less over. We think this represents “reality” because it is backed up by available observational facts. The hypothesis of an anthropogenic global warming (AGW) driven by the post-industrial and especial post-world-war 2 increase in atmospheric CO2 content tells a quite different story. This idea is founded on models; not observations, hence it represents “virtual reality”. There are 102 AGW-models of present-to-future changes in temperature. They all rise up to a level in year 2100 of +2.7 ±0.7 °C. Global observational records from Earth’s surface stations as well as satellite and balloon records from the troposphere give no such trend, however; with little or no rise since 2003. In true science, observations overrule models. Sea level change is another central issue. On a global scale, sea level has changed over the last 300 years in the order of ±1.0 mm/yr (10 cm in 100 yrs). Today, the variability range between ±0.0 and +1.0 mm/yr. Other claims are not anchored in proper observational facts.